Celiac & Gluten Sensitivity; bloodspot-Doctor's Data Kit

Note: This is a home collection test kit that will be mailed to you. NOT to be used for children under the age of 2.



Fasting Required: No

Specimen: Bloodspot

Results: 10-14 Business Days
Note: Result turnaround times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. Our reference lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

NOT to be used for children under the age of 2

Special Instructions: This test should not be performed on patients currently on a gluten free diet (GFD), unless used to monitor long term GFD compliance, or as otherwise directed by your physician.

Description: Celiac disease (CD) is often undiagnosed and is caused in genetically predisposed individuals by abnormal intestinal permeability and abnormal immune response to gluten, a protein complex found in wheat, barley, spelt and rye. The inflammatory autoimmune response is associated with extreme damage to the lining of the small bowel and is associated with diarrhea, bloating, fatigue, nutritional deficiencies, and systemic autoimmune conditions. Although most commonly diagnosed in children, CD is often not expressed until later in life (delayed onset). It has been hypothesized that a gradual or abrupt change in the gastrointestinal microbiome may be responsible for delayed on set. Non-Celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) can cause similar symptoms but without the same level of intestinal epithelial tissue damage.

Individuals with NCGS are often spared the intestinal damage common in Celiac patients, but suffer from abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, and many “extra-intestinal” symptoms such as “foggy mind”, depression, ADHD-like behavior, headaches, bone or joint pain, and chronic fatigue when they have gluten in their diet. There are many antigenic triggers (epitopes) in the gluten protein complex that have cytotoxic, immunomodulatory, and gut permeating properties.

Wheat allergy is caused by an individual’s IgE antibody response to many classes of wheat proteins including; serine protease inhibitors, gliadins, glutelins, prolamins and gluten. Symptoms of a wheat allergy reaction can range from mild, such as hives, to severe, such as anaphylaxis. Wheat allergy symptoms are sometimes confused with those of CD/NCGS, but these conditions differ and testing for IgE antibodies to wheat can aid in making the proper diagnosis.
Allergy

Antibody tests that indicate possible CD and NCGS will only be accurate if the patient is on a gluten-inclusive diet.